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The Louvre in One Hour

The Louvre is one of the most impressive museums in the world. For visitors to Paris, it’s one of the must-see attractions. You’ll hear locals say that you can explore the Louvre for days and still not see everything, but what if you don’t have that kind of time? Here are the most important artifacts you can view in a 60-minute window.

Louvre at Night by Kay Gaensler, on Flickr
Louvre at Night by Kay Gaensler, on Flickr

 

The Louvre is one of the most impressive museums in the world. For visitors to Paris, it’s one of the must-see attractions. You’ll hear locals say that you can explore the Louvre for days and still not see everything, but what if you don’t have that kind of time? Here are the most important artifacts you can view in a 60-minute window.


The Mona Lisa

Arguably the most famous painting of all time, Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa is known to the French as La Joconde. The museum is full of signs pointing the way to her resting place in the gallery. However, beware of long lines and crowds. None of the museum’s visitors like to leave without getting a glimpse of her.

Venus de Milo

This famous, armless statue of Aphrodite was discovered in 1820 on the island of Melos, for which it is named. It lies in Room 7, in the Greek Antiquities collection, and it’s commonly thought of as the second-biggest draw in the Louvre.

The Winged Victory

Another famous Greek statue, Winged Victory of Samothrace, lies in the Greek sculpture area and also attracts many visitors to the museum. The statue once graced the prow of a ship before it was damaged, probably in an earthquake. Only the left wing survived, but the right was restored as a plaster copy.

The Feast of Cana by Donald Windley
The Feast of Cana by Donald Windley

The Wedding Feast at Cana

This famous painting hangs near the Mona Lisa, so it’s convenient to get a look. Veronese depicted Christ’s first miracle in his own era, 16th-century Venice. The massive canvas shows Jesus turning water into wine at a marriage celebration.

The Raft of the Medusa

In Room 77, you can find Théodore Géricault’s famous painting that depicts the true story of the sinking of the Medusa. Due to a life boat shortage, 149 people drifted on a raft for 12 days. The painting shows the cannibalism and slaughter that followed, which made it fairly controversial in 1819.

Napoleon’s Rooms

The Louvre originated as a fortress, and it’s possible to see Napoleon’s apartment, still intact from when French royalty made a home in the building. The furniture and dining room is fascinating, but you’ll be rushing through if you plan to see anything else.

From Egyptian antiquities to Renaissance art, you can see more than you think in just a short amount of time. However long you spend inside the doors of the Louvre, you’ll definitely find it was worth the trip. For more information on flights to Paris and to make the most of this historic city, visit http://cheap-flights.airtransat.ca/YTO-PAR/tickets-toronto-paris.